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Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Troutman Reunion 2014: Connecting with Living Family Members


Cousins, cousins, and more cousins, about 52 all told, showed up at the family reunion in Omaha on July 20, all descendants of Clint and Mary (Waggoner) Troutman. Clint and Mary would be proud. Neville, James, Carl, Verne, and Virginia would be proud. We’re still gathering together every other year to carry on the tradition they started. It takes commitment and work, and it’s worth every effort.
A few years ago when I was working on my MFA in writing and participating in workshops, one of my classmates posed a question about my research and writing on the subject of ancestors: “What do you do to get to know living relatives?” That question had actually been nudging my elbow for some time, but I had been trying to ignore it. To hear it from someone else seemed like a challenge.
Okay. What do I do? At that time, the answer was not much—other than my immediate family, not much. We had moved away from the Troutman clan in Nebraska when I was not quite 14, just when I was reaching the age when relationships with my cousins might begin to take on more meaning and depth. Consequently, I felt out-of-touch with them.
After Myron and I married and settled in Indiana, we made a trip or two to the family reunion in Nebraska, not enough to give our children a sense of belonging with the Troutmans. The busy-ness of our lives and our finances kept travel at a minimum. Plus, Mom and Dad lived in Virginia, the opposite direction from Nebraska, so we chose to go that way every summer.
So how would I get to know my Nebraska cousins again? I had to make a plan. That’s when I learned about MyFamily.com and the opportunity it offered to connect online, so I joined and invited cousins to join. It also gave me an opportunity to share my research. That worked fairly well for a while, but it failed to engage as many as I’d hoped, especially the young people. Why would they want to participate, anyway, when they had Facebook? That’s where the action was.
Despite concerns about privacy, we gave up our password-only MyFamily web site and opened a family group on FB. Even though not many family members post on the family group page, having them as “friends” allows us to at least interact with each other a bit more than otherwise.
Critics of this method of communication say that it is superficial, but isn’t superficial better than nothing? At least the children of my cousins know my name and face and I theirs—and the names and faces of their children. For years we have kept in touch through the annual Christmas letter, and it has been a wonderful record of family happenings. But a once-a-year report on the events of our lives is less engaging than the immediate participation of seeing graduation photos when the event happens. Or seeing pics of the bride and groom, or of the new baby.
But the family reunion is a very special time when we can gather in person for hugs, good food, conversation, and fun, so I am committed to it. Facebook can never take its place.
Didn't get all the cousins on camera, but here are a few pics of our happy event.
Julie, Beth, Ralph, Kirk, Darrell, Bill

Rogene and Jill

Brenda, Bryce, Shirley, Dara

Ruth and Larry

Connee and Harold

Jason, Brock, and Melissa

Genise and Mark

Dwight and Wes

Lee, John, and Verna

Anna or Lydia, Judy, Luke, and Davinia (Matt and Anna or Lydia in water)

Beth, Mark, and Julie--Siblings

Lydia, Anna, Grace, and Jared (Davinia under water)

Lee and Rogene

© 2014, Z. T. Noble

Thursday, July 17, 2014

A Car Wreck and A Will


"As for a man, his days are like grass, 
he flourished like a flower of the field; 
the wind blows over it and it is gone, 
and its place remembers it no more." 
--Psalm 103:15


The car wreck that killed Grandma Mary’s Uncle George and Aunt Willie Wagner happened on a Saturday when they were on their way home from the grocery. It was April 1, 1939. Their car collided with another vehicle at an intersection. I’m not sure which car was at fault (still can’t find the article, but I’ll do my best to recall what I read a couple of years ago), but Willie was thrown from the car and killed instantly. A few days later, George died from his injuries.

On a warm day in May just one month after they died, George and Willie’s personal property was sold at auction. Can you picture the rolling Missouri hills, the first leaves of spring turning the countryside a clean, new green? The fresh morning air fills your lungs. Dew is still wet on the grass. Standing in the yard of the Wagner home you watch neighbors and friends meandering among tables laden with jars of home canned goods, pots, pans, dishes, empty canning jars, a skillet, books, pictures, baskets of miscellaneous. The grass is lined with rows of larger items: a plow, a rake, a hoe, a scythe, hay forks, an ice hook, barrels, baskets of soap, buckets, a churn, a quilt frame, a ladder, shovels, and more. Looking at the list of personal property is like peering into the barn or into the kitchen or into the cellar where all the canned goods were stored. Can you imagine buying jars of tomato preserves or peaches or apples or meat? The auctioneer's chant echoes across the hills. A couple's lifetime accumulation of worldly goods is carted off to the highest bidders like poofs of dandelion seeds scattered to the winds. 




One of our family stories was that Grandma Mary, being George’s niece, received $500.00 from his estate. Of course, I wanted evidence. That seemed like a lot of money. I wondered if other nieces and nephews received as much. My sister Verna lives near Liberty, Missouri, so recently, I asked her to go to the Clay County Court House to get me a copy of George’s will, which she did. Thank you, Verna!

In his will, George had left everything to Willie, but she was gone. His only child was long ago deceased, as well. Consequently, his estate, which was rather sizeable, went to his siblings and half-siblings, and in the case of deceased siblings, to their children.

George had written and signed his will on 9 July 1921 leaving everything to Willie. A man 24 years older than his wife doesn’t expect her to die first. He added a codicil on 8 October 1927 leaving $200.00 in trust to the Board of Deacons of the Mount Olivet Christian Church for the care of the cemetery located near the church.[1] George and Willie were buried in that cemetery. Find A Grave memorial.

Photo courtesy of Find A Grave contributor, Rob Beun.

Photo courtesy of Find A Grave contributor, Deb.
Photo courtesy of Find A Grave contributor, Rob Beun.
  
Since George’s brother/Grandma Mary’s father Eli was deceased, Mary did, indeed, inherit $500.00, as did each of her siblings, plus Gordon’s son James, since Gordon was also deceased—that is, if I understand the will correctly. The children of George’s other deceased siblings, Elias, Missouri Alice, and Amanda V. received an inheritance, as well. There were 26 heirs, all told, and although the amounts and language of the will are a bit confusing, at least the nephews and nieces named below seem to have received $500.00. Readers, please correct me if I have interpreted this page of the will incorrectly.

A page from George W. Wagner's will.


© 2014, Z. T. Noble.



[1] Clay County, Missouri, Probate Record Book M: 457, George W. Wagner; Office of Probate Department, Liberty.

Wednesday, July 9, 2014

The Wagner Feud


 Well, that was exhausting! Writing that family history of Jacob and Ann and Jacob and Fannie, that is. So exhausting that I had to take a couple of weeks off from the blog. Actually, we’ve been on vacation—visiting the grands and celebrating the second year of the Mt. Gretna (PA) School of Art, launched by our son, Jay. Kudos to Jay!

A few details have surfaced since I posted my last blog. I’m grateful for family members who help me out now and then. This time, my sister Verna contributed a little more information on George W. Wagner—his will. More on that later. And some of the following just didn’t fit into the previous narrative, so here it is.

At some point in time, ill feelings developed in the Waggoner family between Anna’s sons and Fannie’s sons. Whatever the problem, it prompted Anna’s sons to leave Virginia. Not all at once, but over a span of about 27 years, they all left. Not all left in anger, but the feud seems to have, at least, involved George, Hezekiah (H.H.), and Willis. I’m not sure who was involved among Fannie’s sons.

According to Elias’ obituary, he left first—in 1882. He married and took his bride, Jane, to Pierce, Nebraska, and that’s where they raised their family.[1] Whatever motivated him to go there is a mystery. Elias’ obituary calls him a pioneer of that town, which was founded in 1869 by Wisconsin Germans.[2] Eli, George, H.H., and Willis left Virginia later, but not all at once.

According to H.H.’s grandson Fred (not his real name), H.H. first went to Texas and lived for five years before coming to Missouri.[3] George and Willis may have gone there, too. Fred says “they” lived in Kentucky and Arkansas, too, but he didn’t make clear who “they” were.[4] Finally the three brothers settled in Clay County, Missouri about 1892—at least George did—not 1882, as stated in the bio of George in the Clay County history book, and as stated in my earlier blog. Fred corrected me on that.[5]

In 1900, George, H.H., and Willis were living together on George’s recently purchased farm; George and H.H. were still single, and Willis was married, but his wife Ollie was still in Virginia.[6] On the next farm lived the Isaac Whistler family, who had an 18-year-old daughter named Willie.[7] This young lady caught George’s eye, and he married her in 1901. He was 43.

Not until 1909 did Grandma Mary’s parents, Eli and Rachel, leave Virginia, and the reason they left is unknown. I think they were just looking for better opportunities. Maybe the other brothers convinced them that Missouri was the place to be.

To the credit of the Wagner brothers, the cause of their grudge was kept secret from the next generation, but cousin Fred told me that his mother, Evelyn, witnessed residual effects of the fury. In April of 1939, when George and Willie died in a car wreck, several of Fannie’s sons came to Missouri for the funeral. Afterward, they all gathered for a family dinner, and after dinner, the children were sent outside to play.[8]

Something sparked H. H.’s anger, and Evelyn heard shouting from inside the house. She heard Green Wagner shouting that H.H. needed to “forgive and forget, & come back to Virginia.” H.H. shouted that he “never would forgive nor forget and would never set foot in Va. again.”[9] That was all Evelyn knew about the feud. The Virginia brothers seem to have kept the secret, too, for a few years ago, Green’s granddaughter told me that she knew nothing about it—not even that there had been a problem.


© 2014, Z. T. Noble


[1] “Former Pierce Resident Dies in Missouri,” Pierce County Call, Pierce, Nebraska, May 23, 1935, p. 1.
[2] “History of Pierce,” Pierce Nebraska (http://www.piercenebraska.com/historyofpierce.html : accessed 8 June 2014).
[3] Fred Cousin, Kansas City, Missouri, to Zola Noble, letter, 28 April 2003, information on Wagner bothers; Waggoner, Jacob binder, Waggoner family; privately held, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE] Anderson, Indiana.
[4] Ibid.
[5] Ibid.
[6] 1900 U. S. census, Clay County, Missouri, population schedule, Galiton Township, enumeration district [ED] 18, p. 50 (stamped), sheet 1-A, dwelling 6, family 6, George Wagner; digital image Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 8 June 2014); NARA microfilm publication T623, roll 849.
[7] 1900 U. S. census, Clay County, Missouri, population schedule, Galiton Township, enumeration district [ED] 18, p. 50 (stamped), sheet 1-A, dwelling 5, family 5, Isaac Whistler family; digital image Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 8 June 2014); NARA microfilm publication T623, roll 849.
[8] Fred Cousin, to Zola Noble, letter, 28 April 2003.
[9] Ibid.

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Jacob and Fannie: Their Eleven Children


It's sometimes crazy trying to keep all these people sorted out. I’ve been studying my sources to be sure all the facts were as accurate as possible before posting the children of Jacob and Fannie. So, I’ve discovered two mistakes: (1) Flavius G., age 2, from the 1880 census, I’m sure should be Franklin G. The name was not erroneously transcribed; it’s clearly Flavius G. But there is no record of Flavius anywhere else. There are, however, many records of Franklin Green Wagner, who was born 25 December 1877 and would have been 2 when the 1880 census was taken, but his name is missing—but not really. I’m certain that it was recorded incorrectly. Most of his life, he was called Green. (2) Minnie Kate had a twin who died that I overlooked. So here’s the list.

Known Children of Jacob A.4 Waggoner and Frances Josephine “Fanny” Kirby

14       x          PETER S.5 WAGGONER born 29 May 1872, Bland County[1]; died 30 May 1901 in Washington County, Virginia.[2] He married, 29 January 1898, Maggie Blanche Murrell, b. 1874,[3] daughter of C.C. and Sarah Murell.[4] They had one daughter.

Peter S. Wagner's grave marker, Kelly's Chapel Cemetery.
 15       xi         ALBERT TUCKER5 WAGGONER born 28 Dec 1873, Bland County[5]; died 7 Dec 1902[6]; married 25 Dec 1901, Sadie White,[7] born 1878, Washington County, daughter of James and Virginia White.[8] They had no known children.

16       xii        JACOB SMITH5 WAGGONER born 26 Sep 1875, Bland County; died 18 April 1956, Washington County.[9] Married, 5 June 1899, Thea Virginia Yates daughter of John and Virginia Yates.[10] They had one known daughter.

Photo courtesy of Find A Grave contributor, Barry L. Seitz.


17       xiii       FRANKLIN GREEN5 WAGGONER born 25 Dec 1877, Bland County; 23 May 1958, Washington County.[11] He married, 18 Dec. 1901, Jennie Witt, b. 28 May 1878, d. 28 Dec. 1965, daughter of John and Mary (Deskins) Witt.[12] They had four known children. Green's granddaughter, Margaret Wagner Allen, is the one who provided much of the information on Fannie's children for the Adam Waggoner Family book. She has also sent me many photos and other information on Jacob Waggoner's family. In 2004, she gave me a grand tour of Kelly's Chapel Cemetery and showed me the property where Jacob and Fannie lived near Emery and Henry College.

 
Franklin Green Wagner, c. 1901

Jennie Witt Wagner, c. 1901

18       xiv       TERRY MAIDEN5 WAGGONER born 29 Nov 1879, Bland County[13]; died 1943, Washington County.[14] He married, 13 Jan. 1904, Tabitha Hale, daughter of William B. and Matilda Jane Hale of Grayson County.[15] They had six known children. Terry was a farmer.[16]

Terry Maiden and Tabitha Hale Wagner and their firstborn, Lillian, c. 1905.

 19       xv       SALLIE MARIE5 WAGGONER born 31 Oct. 1881, Bland County; 21 Sep. 1901, Washington County.[17] Buried Kelly’s Chapel Cemetery. Never married. Died of typhoid fever.[18]
Photo courtesy of Find A Grave contributor, Barry L. Seitz.


20       xvi       OLLIE ELIZABETH5 WAGGONER born 10 Feb 1884, Bland County; 10 Jan. 1953, Washington County.[19] She married, 17 Nov. 1902, Samuel Hugh Kelly, born 13 Nov. 1876 and died 4 June 1948, son of William Ryburn and Ellen (Byers) Kelley.[20] They had eight known children and lived on a farm in Washington County.[21]

Samuel H. and Ollie Elizabeth Wagner Kelly
 21       xvii      MINNIE KATHERINE5 WAGGONER born 20 Feb 1886, Washington County; died 6 January 1959.[22] Never married. Buried beside her mother in Kelly’s Chapel Cemetery.

Minnie Kate Wagner, c. 1910.

 22       xviii     BELLE5 WAGGONER, born 20 Feb 1886, Washington County, twin to Minnie Kate[23]; death date unknown.

23       xix       EDDIE L.5 WAGGONER (f) born 16 Aug 1888, Washington County; died 29 April 1889.[24] Cause of death was meningitis.[25]

24       xx        JASPER MONROE5 WAGGONER born 23 Jun 1890, Washington County; died 5 June 1950, Sugar Creek, Walworth, Wisconsin.[26] He married, 27 May 1919 in Freeport Illinois, Esther Bolton, born 6 July 1898 in Walworth County, Wisconsin to Edward and Sarah (Davis) Bolton.[27] He operated a tavern in Elkhorn, Wisconsin.[28] Jasper is the only one of Fannie’s children to leave Virginia. He served with U. S. Naval Reserve Forces during World War I.
Photo courtesy of Find A Grave contributor, Kellie Jensen Walton.
 


© 2014, Z. T. Noble.


[1] Bland County, Virginia Births: 1861-96, p. 25, No Name Waggoner,  May 29, 1872; database Ancestry.com (http://ancestry.com : accessed 24 May 2014).
[2] Kelly's Chapel Cemetery (Washington County, Virginia); Peter S. Wagner, marker; photographed March 2004 by the researcher.
[3] Virginia, Select Marriages, 1783-1940, database Ancestry.com (http://ancestry.com : accessed 16 June 2014), P. S. Wagner and Maggie Blanche Murrell, 29 Jan 1898.
[4] Hatcher and Nash, Adam Waggoner Family, 36.
[5] Bland County, Virginia Births: 1861-96, p. 27, Albert Waggoner, Dec 28, 1873; database Ancestry.com (http://ancestry.com : accessed 24 May 2014).
[6] Hatcher and Nash, Adam Waggoner Family, 36.
[7] Virginia, Select Marriages, 1783-1940, database Ancestry.com (http://ancestry.com : accessed 16 June 2014), A. F. Wagner and Sadie White, 25 Dec 1901.
[8] Hatcher and Nash, Adam Waggoner Family, 36.
[9] Find A Grave, database and images (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 21 February 2014), photograph, memorial page for Jacob S. Wagner (1875-1956), Find A Grave memorial no. 92321480, citing Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Glade Spring, Virginia; photographs contributed by Barry L. Seitz.
[10] Virginia, Select Marriages, 1783-1940, database Ancestry.com (http://ancestry.com : accessed 16 June 2014), J. S. Wagner and Thia Virginia Yates, 5 Jun 1899.
[11] Find A Grave, database and images (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 21 February 2014), photograph, memorial page for Franklin Green Wagner (1877-1958), Find A Grave memorial no. 91257451, citing Kelly’s Chapel Cemetery, Washington County, Virginia; photographs contributed by Z. T. Noble.
[12] Hatcher and Nash, Adam Waggoner Family, 37.
[13] Bland County, Virginia Births: 1861-96, p. 54, Terry Waggoner, Dec 8, 1879.
[14] Find A Grave, database and images (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 18 June 2014), photograph, memorial page for Terry M. Wagner (1879-1943), Find A Grave memorial no. 92376013, citing Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Glade Spring, Virginia. photographs contributed by Barry L. Seitz.
[15] Hatcher and Nash, Adam Waggoner Family, 38.
[16] 1910 U. S. census, Holston, Washington County, Virginia, population schedule, enumeration district [ED] 121, p. 1-B, dwelling 18, family 18, Leory [Terry] M. Wagoner; digital image Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 June 2014); NARA microfilm publication T624, roll 1651.
[17] Find A Grave, database and images (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 21 February 2014), photograph, memorial page for Sallie Marie Wagner (1881-1901), Find A Grave memorial no. 91284062, citing Kelly’s Chapel Cemetery, Washington County, Virginia; photographs contributed by Barry L. Seitz.
[18] Hatcher and Nash, Adam Waggoner Family, 37.
[19] Find A Grave, database and images (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 21 February 2014), photograph, memorial page for Ollie Elizabeth Wagner Kelley (1884-1953), Find A Grave memorial no. 92453476, citing Kelly’s Chapel Cemetery, Washington County, Virginia; photograph contributed by Barry L. Seitz.
[20] Hatcher and Nash, Adam Waggoner Family, 37.
[21] 1930 U. S. census, Washington County, Virginia, population schedule, Holston precinct, p. 201 (stamped), enumeration district [ED] 96-12, sheet 8-B, dwelling 157, family 157, Samuel H. Kelley; digital image Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 18 June 2014); NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 2463.
[22] Find A Grave, database and images (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 21 February 2014), photograph, memorial page for Kate Wagner (1887-1959), Find A Grave memorial no. 91257191, citing Kelly’s Chapel Cemetery, Washington County, Virginia; photograph contributed by Z. T. Noble.
[23] Hatcher and Nash, Adam Waggoner Family, 42.
[24] Virginia Deaths and Burials Index, 1853-1917, Eddie L. Wagoner, database Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 12 May 2014).
[25] Hatcher and Nash, Adam Waggoner Family, 42.
[26] Find A Grave, database and images (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 21 February 2014), photograph, memorial page for Jasper Monroe Wagner (1890-1950), Find A Grave memorial no. 30487838, citing Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Tibbets, Walworth County, Wisconsin; photograph contributed by Kellie Jensen Walton.
[27] Hatcher and Nash, Adam Waggoner Family, 42.
[28] Ibid.

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

Jacob and Ann: Their Children


Since January 2013, I’ve been studying the book, Professional Genealogy, edited by Elizabeth Shown Mills, with a group of nine people plus three others: a mentor, a group coordinator, and an administrator. I’m truly grateful to have had the privilege of learning professional genealogy with these wonderful people: Jill, Rorey, Lise, Lilly, Lynn, Ami, Barry, and Angela G., plus Craig, Teresa, and Angela Mc. The group is appropriately called ProGen Study Group.  Our final assignment has been to write a history of one couple and list their children, two generations. Then we critique each other’s work and revise.

It just so happened that when this assignment came around, I was blogging on Anna Harman and Jacob Waggoner, so despite the daunting number of Jacob’s children, plus not wanting to be researching two families at the same time, I chose Jacob and Ann for my assignment. My previous three blogs have been part of that assignment. The final part is to create a genealogical summary complete with sources for every fact. This is what you see today—the first half anyway—Anna’s children. (The small raised numbers beside the names designate generation numbers, not footnotes. Generation 1 is the immigrant, Adam Waggoner. The Roman numerals designate birth order.) This summary does not include children born to the unions of Jacob’s children and their spouses, but just to let you know, I’ve added the number of children they produced. You might notice that of all 20 of Jacob’s children, Grandma Mary’s father Eli produced the greatest number of children at nine. Occasionally, I have inserted a comment that won't be in my final version of my assignment; neither will the photos.

Genealogical Summary
of
Jacob A. Waggoner of Southwestern Virginia,
His Two Wives and Twenty Children


4.  Jacob4 A. Waggoner (Elias3, George2, Adam1) was born 16 September 1826[1] in Tazewell County, Virginia;[2] he died 1 October 1901,[3] in Washington County, Virginia.[4] Jacob first married, 6 July 1853,[5] Anna F. Harman, daughter of Henry J. Harman and Famy (Brown) Harman.[6] Anna was born 15 February 1834,[7] probably Smyth County as that’s where her parents lived at the time, but I have no verifying info on her place of birth, and died 9 March 1871, in Bland County.[8] Jacob second married, 19 December 1871, Frances Josephine “Fannie” Kirby in Bland County,[9] daughter of Stephen Kirby and Margaret Ann (Doak) Kirby,[10] born 12 July 1849 and died 14 February 1929.[11]

Known Children of Jacob A. Waggoner and Anna F. Harman

5.      i.  ELIAS HENRY5 WAGGONER (nicknamed Charley) was born 4 October 1853, Bland                    County, Virginia, and died 16 March 1926, Liberty, Missouri. He married, 18                             December 1881, Louise Jane Burge of Bland County. In 1882 they moved to Pierce
   County, Nebraska, where they lived until 1910 when they moved to Liberty,
   Missouri, where three of his brothers lived. They had four known children.[12]

Elias and Jane Waggoner and 3 of their children, Myrtle, Ida, and Kelly.
Elias "Charley" and Jane Waggoner, Myrtle, Kelly, and Ida. A son George died at age 18.

  6.     ii  ELI PIERCE5 WAGGONER was born 25 October 1854, Smyth County, Virginia,[13] and                 died 16 February 1925, Audrain County, Missouri.[14] He first married, 21 July 1881,                 Betty O. Colley.[15] They had no known children. Eli second married, 2 September                          1885, Rachel Havens.[16] They had nine known children.

Eli and Rachel Waggoner family: Mary, Emery, Alice, Ida, Gordon, Jacob, Amanda, and Leo.
 
   7.  iii   GEORGE W.5 WAGGONER was born 27 January 1857 Bland County, Virginia, and died
              5 April 1939, Clay County, Missouri.[17] He married Willie Wisler, 24 April 1901, Clay
              County, Missouri.[18] She was born 20 October 1881 in Missouri to Isaac and Dosie               Wisler.[19] She died 1 April 1939.[20] They had one known daughter who died in infancy.
  George came to Clay County, Missouri, in 1882 with a small suitcase and $50.00. He  
  worked for $18.00 a month for eighteen years until he was able to purchase 40 acres of land.
  Later he purchased an additional 100 acres. He managed his farm well and became a  
  “successful farmer and stockman of Gallatin township,” raising hogs, sheep, and cattle.[21] 
  George and Willie died as a result of injuries sustained in an auto accident. (Somewhere, I   
  have copies of newspaper articles about the accident, but I can't find them at the moment! 
  Grrr!)

George and Willie (Wisler) Wagner
 8.   iv   MAUDE ALICE5 WAGGONER born 16 August 1859, Bland County, Virginia,[22] and died               after 1930.[23] She married James Marion Hubble in 1882 in Virginia.[24] They had five               known children.
 
9.      v   HEZEKIAH HIRAM5 WAGGONER born 27 January 1861, Bland County, Virginia, and                  died 1 August 1957, Clay County, Missouri.[25] He married Lottie Mae Hayes, 17
November 1903 in Missouri. H.H. owned 40 acres that shared a border with his brother   George’s land. They had one known child, a daughter.

Hezekiah H. Waggoner, taken in Abingdon, VA, c. 1880

HH Wagner, at age 96, with daughter Evelyn and family, May 1957.

HH and Ottie Wagner, their home in Clay County, Missouri.

HH and Lottie Wagner, their farm in Clay County, Missouri.

10.    vi  ARDELIA IBBIE5 WAGGONER born June 1864, Bland County, Virginia,[26] and died
  1956, Bland County. Ibbie married Fisher G. Gearing, 6 December 1882 in Bland
  County. They had three known children. [27]

11.   vii  AMANDA V.5 WAGGONER born February 1866,[28] Bland County, and died after
  1940.[29] She married Piper W. Neff in 1900, after June 7, in Roanoke, Virginia.[30]
   They had no known children.

 12. viii  WILLIS GRANT5 WAGGONER born 12 January 1869, Bland County, and died 17
   February 1956, Liberty, Clay County, Missouri.[31] According to a granddaughter, Willis
   married Ottie Buchanan, 5 October 1898, in Virginia, and then left for Missouri without
   her. After 10 years, he finally brought Ottie to Missouri.[32] They had four known
   children, all sons.
Ottie and Willis Wagner on the occasion of their 50th wedding anniversary.
13.  ix   WILLIAM STEWART5 WAGGONER born 8 March 1871, Bland County,[33] and died 24
              September 1871, in Bland County.[34]

One more note: I'm struck by how much these brothers resemble each other: narrow chins, high cheek bones, deep set eyes, much like their mother, tempered by the good looks of their father.

© 2014, Z. T. Noble.


[1] Kelly’s Chapel Cemetery (Washington County, Virginia); Jacob Wagner marker, photographed 20 August 2008 by the researcher.
[2] Thomas C. Hatcher and Nancy Nash, The Adam Waggoner Family of Tazewell and Montgomery Counties  Virginia, 1750-1996 (no place: no publisher, 1996), 32.
[3] Kelly’s Chapel Cemetery (Washington Co., Va.); Jacob Wagner marker.
[4] Hatcher and Nash, The Adam Waggoner Family, 32.
[5] Harman, Harman Genealogy, 162.
[6] Ibid., 159, 162.
[7] Ibid., 162. Also, Virginia Deaths and Burials Index, 1853-1917, database Ancestry.com (http://ancestry.com : accessed 12 May 2014), Anna Waggoner.
[8] Virginia Deaths and Burials Index, 1853-1917, Anna Waggoner.
[9] Bland Co., Va., Marriage Records, Book 1:8, Jacob Waggoner and Fanie J. Kirby. Also, Hatcher and Nash, The Adam Waggoner Family, p. 34.
[10] Hatcher and Nash, The Adam Waggoner Family, p. 34.
[11] Kelly’s Chapel Cemetery; Fannie J. Wagner marker.
[12] “Former Pierce Resident Dies in Missouri,” Pierce County Call, Pierce, Nebraska, May 23, 1935, p. 1.
[13] Smyth County, Virginia, Register of Births, Book 1: 71, entry for Eli P. Wagner; County Clerk’s Office, Marion.
[14] Missouri State Board of Health, death certificate no. 3554, Eli P. Waggoner (1925); Bureau of Vital Statistics, Jefferson City.
[15] Smyth County Register of Marriages, Book 1: 59, Eli P. Wagoner and Betty O. Colly, 1881; County Clerk’s Office, Marion.
[16] Jacquie Mitchell, Eli Waggoner—Rachel Havens Family Group Sheet, private collection, supplied by Mitchell, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE] Bothell, Washington, 2000. This sheet offers no list of sources used, no documentation. A search of Smyth County marriage books has not resulted in a record for this marriage. Surrounding counties need to be searched. This marriage date also appears in obituaries of Eli and Rachel.
[17] Findagrave.com, digital images (http://www.findagrave.com : accessed 22 May 2014), photograph, gravestone for George W. Wagner (1857-1939), Mount Olivet Christian Church Cemetery, Clay County, Missouri.
[18] Clay County, Missouri, Missouri Marriage Records, 1805-2002, database Ancestry.com (http://ancestry.com : accessed 9 June 2014),  entry for George W. Wagner and Willie Wisler, 24 April 1901.
[19] 1900 U. S. census, Galiton, Clay County, Missouri, population schedule, enumeration district (ED) 18, p. 50 (stamped), sheet 1-A, dwelling 5, family 5, Isaac Whistler family, digital image Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 8 June 2014); NARA microfilm publication T623, roll 849.
[20] Find A Grave, database and images (http://findagrave.com : accessed 8 June 2014), photograph, memorial page for Willie (Wisler) Wagner (1881 - 1939), Find A Grave Memorial no. 39116963, created by “Deb,” citing Mount Olivet Christian Church Cemetery, Smithville, Clay County, Missouri; photograph contributed by “Deb.” 
[21] W. H. Woodson, History of Clay County, Missouri (Topeka, KS: Historical Publishing Company, 1920), 504; digital image, The Library of Congress (https://archive.org/details/
historyofclaycou00wood : accessed 10 June 2014).
[22] 1900 U. S. census, Smyth County, Virginia, population schedule, Olympia Precinct, p. 142 (stamped), enumeration district [ED] 86, sheet 7-A, dwelling 117, family 117, Maud A. Hubble; digital image Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 22 May 2014); NARA microfilm publication T623, roll 1728.
[23] 1930 U. S. census, Smyth County, Virginia, population schedule, Olympia precinct, p. 201 (stamped), enumeration district [ED] 87-11, sheet 4-A, dwelling 51, family 58, Alice M.  Hubble; digital image Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 24 May 2014); NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 2461. Maude Alice was alive for this census in 1930. I haven't been able to find her in the 1940 census, so I don't know how long she lived after 1930.
[24] 1900 U. S. census, Olympia, Smyth County, Virginia, population schedule, enumeration district (ED) 86, p. 142 (stamped), sheet 7-A, dwelling 117, family 117, James Hubble family; digital image Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 8 June 2014); NARA microfilm publication T623, roll 1728.
[25] Findagrave.com, memorial for Hezekiah Hiram Wagner (1857-1939), Fairview Cemetery, Liberty, Clay County, Missouri.
[26] 1900 U. S. census, Sedden, Bland County, Virginia, population schedule, enumeration district [ED] 3, p. 93 (stamped), sheet 2-A, dwelling 24, family 24,  Tobie Gegring [Ibbie Gearing]; digital image Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 22 May 2014); NARA microfilm publication T623, roll 1701.
[27] Hatcher and Nash, The Adam Waggoner Family, 33.
[28] 1900 U. S. census, Roanoke County, Virginia, population schedule, Salem, enumeration district [ED] 77, p. 209 (stamped), sheet 8-B, dwelling 129, family 129, Amanda Wagoner, digital image Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 22 May 2014); NARA microfilm publication T623, roll 1725.
[29] 1940 U. S. census, Roanoke County, Virginia, population schedule, Salem, ED no. 81-20, p. 423 (stamped), sheet 3-A, house no. 45, Amanda Naff, digital image Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 24 May 2014); NARA microfilm publication T627, roll 4289. Death date is unknown, but Amanda was living when the 1940 census was taken.
[30] 1910 U. S. census, Salem, Roanoke County, Virginia, population schedule, enumeration disctict (ED) no. 77, sheet 8-B, dwelling 129, family 129, Eugene Abbott household, Amanda Wagoner, digital image Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 8 June 2014); NARA microfilm publication T623, roll 1725. Also, 1930 U. S. census, Roanoke County, population schedule, Salem precinct, enumeration district [ED] 9, sheet 15-B, dwelling 326, family 326, Piper W. Naff household; digital image Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 8 June 2014); NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 2457. The 1900 census taken on June 7 records Amanda as single, but the 1930 census says she was married at age 33. From her birth year, age at marriage, and marital status in 1900 one can infer that she married in 1900, after 7 June.
[31] Find A Grave, database and images (http://findagrave.com : accessed 8 June 2014), memorial page for Willis Grant Wagner (1869 - 1956), Find A Grave Memorial no. 41608296, created by “Deb,” citing Mount Olivet Christian Church Cemetery, Smithville, Clay County, Missouri; photographs contributed by “Deb” and “ztnoble.” 
[32]  lgrilli138 to ztnoble, private message, 4 October 2013, “Re: Venice and Garland Waggoner Photos,” Messages, Ancestry.com.
[33] Bland County, Virginia Births: 1861-96, p. 22, William Waggoner, 8 March 1871; database Ancestry.com (http://ancestry.com : accessed 24 May 2014).
[34] Virginia Deaths and Burials Index, 1853-1917, Wm J Waggoner.